Low-THC & Medical Cannabis

What is low-THC cannabis?

In Florida, low-THC cannabis is distinct from medical cannabis in that it contains very low amounts of the psychoactive component tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Because of its low levels of THC, low-THC products do not have the euphoric properties of full-potency cannabis and typically do not result in patients experiencing the “high” commonly associated with cannabis.

In order to qualify as low-THC, the flowers, seeds, resin, and any other product derived from the cannabis plant must contain 0.8 percent or less of THC and more than 10 percent of cannabidiol (CBD) weight for weight.

What is medical cannabis?

In Florida, medical cannabis is distinct from low-THC cannabis in that it can contain significant amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This is the chemical compound that causes the “high” commonly associated with cannabis..

The term medical cannabis includes all parts of a cannabis plant, its seeds, resin extracted from any part of the plant; and every compound, manufacture, sale, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant or its seeds or resin

What is medical cannabis?

In Florida, medical cannabis is distinct from low-THC cannabis in that it can contain significant amounts of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This is the chemical that causes the “high” commonly associated with cannabis. When consumed in large enough doses, medical cannabis can cause patients significant discomfort, and its use should be closely monitored by the ordering physician.

Under Florida law, the term medical cannabis includes all parts of a cannabis plant, its seeds, resin extracted from any part of the plant; and every compound, manufacture, sale, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant or its seeds or resin.

Who qualifies for medical cannabis?

A qualified physician may only order cannabis for a patient with a terminal condition that is attested to by the patient’s physician and confirmed by a second independent evaluation by a board-certified physician in an appropriate specialty for that condition. Patient is defined in section 499.0295, Florida Statutes.

Florida law defines a terminal condition as a “progressive disease or medical or surgical condition that causes significant functional impairment, is not considered by a treating physician to be reversible even with the administration of available treatment options currently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, and, without the administration of life-sustaining procedures, will result in death within one year after diagnosis if the condition runs its normal course.”

Medical cannabis is different from low-THC cannabis. Physicians treating patients with cancer, chronic seizures, or chronic muscle spasms can find more information about low-THC cannabis here.

The medical use of medical cannabis does NOT include the following:
  • The possession, use or administration of medical cannabis by smoking.
  • The transfer of medical cannabis to a person other than the qualified patient for whom it was ordered or their legal representative.
  • The use or administration of medical cannabis on any form of public transportation, in any public place, in a qualified patient’s place of employment, if restricted by his or her employer, in a state correctional institution, on the grounds of a preschool, primary school, or secondary school or any school bus or vehicle